Funny Hillbilly Stereotypes

The list of hillbilly stereotypes is long and mostly undeserved. It is not true that every hillbilly kills their dinner with their old pickup truck. It is not true that they’re all related or uneducated. They’re not stuck out in the middle of nowhere anymore either. They have come to live in the big cities, everywhere. They shop at grocery stores and watch the same TV we all do. Though our views of the world may differ from that of a true hillbilly, we do still live in the same world. Actually, we all live in the same country.

For all the processed meats in a can, what is so wrong with wanting to know where your food comes from? At least if you hit the possum, you know what wood it lived in and you don’t have to worry about additives that can kill you. Sure beats reading all them labels at the store, but hillbillies actually shop at Wal-Mart with the rest of us. Why go through all that trouble of sitting and waiting for a possum to cross the road? …

January 18th, 2009 by Clem Bob 

Hillbillies and Cooking Roadkill for a Tasty Meal

Hillbillies and Cooking Roadkill for a Tasty Meal

Today we are going to look at the truth about Hillbilly stereotypes. Remember, every word of this is true. (or it wouldn’t be on the Internet!)

To most of America, a Hillbilly is a person, usually white, uneducated, and living in the southern United States. The word Hillbilly is sometimes used as an insult, but more commonly it’s used in a joking fashion.

A common stereotype of Hillbilly life is that we are all inbred. Ask your self this: Is everyone in the south hideously deformed? If you answered yes, LEAVE NOW. My purpose here is to disprove all the unfair stereotypes that Hillbillies are forced to live with. All (ok, most) of these stereotypes are completely false.

A common myth is that all hillbillies live in the middle of the woods, and eat whatever they accidentally hit with their car. This is true!*

January 7th, 2009 by Clem Bob 

Hillbilly Stereotypes And Nutty Buckeyes

Having spent a lot of my youth in the Kentucky hills I grew up hearing and seeing all the stereotypes associated with “hillbillies” and country folk. While people have different ways of speaking and doing things in different parts of the world most of the stereotypes are greatly exaggerated and some aren’t even close.
 
These days the cultural differences among people from different parts of the US are growing smaller and smaller. It is as though the world is getting smaller. 30 years ago you might have to drive 25 miles of narrow, curving roads through the steep hills to get to a major store. Today the same person can just get on the “new” four lane highway and be there in less than 15 minutes as they drive in excess of 55 mph.
 
Cable and satellite television, free or low cost nationwide telephone calls and the Internet have also made the world, for all practical intents, a smaller place. Children are growing up with television and the world wide web and even those who live in the “boonies” are exposed to a much larger
December 8th, 2008 by Clem Bob